Seasonal traveler…

Green Heron

Careful observation at Lincoln Park’s North Pond can reveal unique birds. This Green Heron (Butorides virenscens) probably wintered in the southern States or Central America. In the South they frequent coastal areas or Mangrove swamps. In the Midwest they are content to residency by ponds and wetlands. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Subtle clues…

Shadows of Sea Grass accompanied by bird tracks, probably a Seagull’s. The occasional shell adds to the composition without changing our focus. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royalty at the Sea…

Royal Terns attempting to claim space while they watch for a meal. Perhaps acting un-royal at this moment. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royal Tern (Thalasseus maximus) means “greatest Sea fisherman”. Quite a statement to live up to. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royal Terns‘ tail feathers fan out when they are flight. Compare to the closed position otherwise on the beach. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Amid the human footprints the Royal Terns take a break from fishing, yet remain alert for more human feet. Notice their wings-out stance. They waddle to and from the shoreline in this stance. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Background designs…

Backgrounds should compliment and not distract the viewer from the main subject. When they are out of focus they add an element of dimension to the image. These two images of Ibis, at Flaminco Gardens in their Rookery area, cleary demonstrate impressionistic, out-of-focus backgrounds. Not sure if they’re too distracting; but for me they add an element of design not usually found in images of birds. Enjoy or not; let me know please.

Ibis in the Duckweed rich Rookery at Flamingo Gardens. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A little while later the Ibis was in a clearer patch of the Rookery pond. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Snake, snake!!….

The Ahinga (Ahinga Ahinga) seems to need it’s name reinforced with repetition. Other telling names are Snake Bird, Water Turkey and American Darter. When in the water the body is submerged except for the long neck yielding the appearance of a snake, giving it the nickname of Snake Bird, which is a translation the Brazillian Tupi word “Ahinga.

Female Ahinga. Notice it’s Scarlett red eyes rimmed with blue. The pale neck and breast distinguish it from the male. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The Ahinga uses it’s beak like a spear to catch it’s fish dinner. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on the Ahinga. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Just too cute…

I’ll share their name (kind) and parents in the next post. But these CUTE little babies were enjoying their freedom in the Rookery rich with Duckweed. We were enjoying watching them while exploring Flamingo Gardens in Davie, Florida.

Slowly, steadily, enjoying a first outing by themselves. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

New siblings swimming close together, being a little unsure,through the Duckweed. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg