Lifestyle contrasts…

The cats on this quaint street in Miami easily roamed from backyard to sites around the neighborhood. The dog was too large to fit between the fence rails ensuring it’s limited experiences. The differences in their demeanor were striking to me.

Cat trying to hide it’s presence as it birdwatches. It was happy to expose itself when people came near so they could get him/her. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Cat enjoying socializing with passer-bys. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

This dear dog looked totally bored and yearning for more in life. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royalty at the Sea…

Royal Terns attempting to claim space while they watch for a meal. Perhaps acting un-royal at this moment. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royal Tern (Thalasseus maximus) means “greatest Sea fisherman”. Quite a statement to live up to. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royal Terns‘ tail feathers fan out when they are flight. Compare to the closed position otherwise on the beach. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Amid the human footprints the Royal Terns take a break from fishing, yet remain alert for more human feet. Notice their wings-out stance. They waddle to and from the shoreline in this stance. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Background designs…

Backgrounds should compliment and not distract the viewer from the main subject. When they are out of focus they add an element of dimension to the image. These two images of Ibis, at Flaminco Gardens in their Rookery area, cleary demonstrate impressionistic, out-of-focus backgrounds. Not sure if they’re too distracting; but for me they add an element of design not usually found in images of birds. Enjoy or not; let me know please.

Ibis in the Duckweed rich Rookery at Flamingo Gardens. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A little while later the Ibis was in a clearer patch of the Rookery pond. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Snake, snake!!….

The Ahinga (Ahinga Ahinga) seems to need it’s name reinforced with repetition. Other telling names are Snake Bird, Water Turkey and American Darter. When in the water the body is submerged except for the long neck yielding the appearance of a snake, giving it the nickname of Snake Bird, which is a translation the Brazillian Tupi word “Ahinga.

Female Ahinga. Notice it’s Scarlett red eyes rimmed with blue. The pale neck and breast distinguish it from the male. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The Ahinga uses it’s beak like a spear to catch it’s fish dinner. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on the Ahinga. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Dingy beauty…

An oxymoron it seems; but someone chose its name, Dingy-flowered Star Orchid (Epidendrum amphistomum). Orchids are never “dingy”. But this is this dear Orchid’s name.

The Dingy-flowered Star Orchid is considered an endangered native of Florida.

Tiny Orchid blooms have visitors. This flower has no nectar but it’s aroma attracts moths (not shown here) for pollination. Copyright 2018, Pamela Breitberg

Overall view of the Dingy-flowered Star Orchid. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Flexibility…

Grooming takes on new skills when you’re a Pelican.

Took a few moments of observation to verify that this is a Pelican. Can’t imagine doing everything for life without arms and hands. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Handsome, until he opens his mouth…

Male Peacock feathers. Copyright 2019 Pamela Breitberg

Hello! Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Handsome pose, as it hopes to attract the attention of a female passerby. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

When the male Peacock makes his mate-seeking call it is piercingly loud and awfully tuned. His call does not match his beauty Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Friend or foe…

On my stretch break in-between painting sessions Thursday I walked around the main pond at Bonnet House, camera in-hand as always. Hugh, their widower Swan was in the grass grooming himself. Then the story began; see the turtle sticking his head out of the water. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Rising out of the water comes this Turtle, seeming to have his eye on Hugh, named for Hugh Taylor Birch, the father of the original owner of the Bonnet House. The home and property were a wedding gift to his daughter, Helen, and her new husband. Fredrick Clay Bartlett. Copyright 2018, Pamela Breitberg

Hugh stopped grooming for a moment to watch the turtle waddle out of the water and towards him. I was unsure if they were friends or foe. Hugh was widowed when his wife, Helen,the female swan died a few years ago. Before her death they had numberous successful hatches; who were relocated because Swans are very territorial. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Neighbors for certain. Friend or foe, not so certain. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Physical contact made. No fight or warning seemed to happen so I am assuming they are friends or at least tolerant neighbors. At any rate it’s a very assertive turtle; his out head never retreated inside his shell. Watching this interaction was as much fun for me as painting. I’m a nature lover first and foremost. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

American treasure…

Sandhill Crane (Grass canadenis) relaxing in the Rookery area of Flamingo Gardens. It is distinguished by it’s large size and red forehead. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

These birds are unwanted in neighborhoods because they are agressive due to habitat destruction threatening their population in Florida. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on living with Sandhill Cranes. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Confusion in a name…

Blindly foraging for food through dense Duckweed. This pair were also in the Rookery area of Flamingo Gardens; they are Domestic Swan Geese (Anser cygnoides). Confusion in a name?! They have the body of geese yet I suppose they could like Swan-ish? Maybe. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Blindly foraging for food through the dense Duckweed. Domestic Swan Goose originated in East Asia. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Fair guess that this is a Goose feather. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Partner Goose takes a breath from fishing. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Pair of Domestic Swan Geese in the Rookery’s thick Duckweed. I am unsure if perhaps the whiteish one is a hybrid. See this link for more information: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swan_goose#Description . Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg