Enjoy the wonders of each new day…

Happy New Year to all my followers. YOU make this blog fun to continue. May you SEE all the beauty and miracles in the details of every day life.

Wonder-filled details of a Waterlily. One of many daily miracles around us. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Multiple purposes…

I enjoy the Japanese Anemone for their late fall, tall, delicate white blooms. This spider takes advantage of the sturdy stems for a different reason. Side lighting from morning sun helped to make the web visible for these images.

Spider at work on Japanese Anemone. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Spider at work on Japanese Anemone. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Spiderweb between two Japanese Anemone. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Spiderweb between two Japanese Anemone. Copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait of a friend or foe…

What does this spring beauty stir in your mind? Regards, new life, unrequited love, or egoism? There seem to be as many meanings associated with Daffodils are there are peoples who have enjoyed its beauty. And I know this lovely brings negative thoughts for those that suffer allergic ills when too close.

Late afternoon sun lit the daffodil in these portraits. Digital images have the ability to capture details and texture under high contrast light that film was never able to render.

For more confusion on what the name “Daffodil” means:  http://thedaffodilsociety.com/wordpress/miscellany/daffodilsthe-language-of-flowers/

Sunlit portrait of Daffodil, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Sunlit portrait of Daffodil, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait 2, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait 2, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Straight forward portrait of Daffodil, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Straight forward portrait of Daffodil, copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

After the first impression…

Wildlife setting at edge of forest, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Wildlife setting at edge of forest, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

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Closer portrait of perennial’s fall stage of life; copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

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Seed head with seed under already-gone seed pod; copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Close up of fuzzy, detail full, seed head; copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Close up of fuzzy, detail full, seed head; copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

At first glance what is seen is past-its-prime dead weeds in front of the colorful fall foliage. Getting closer shows dried leaves and seed heads standing tall, contrasting with the still alive tree leaves. Still closer shows evidence that the “life cycle” progression of the season varies even on one the single stalk of one perennial. The closest image shows the intricate details of nature.

I am unsure of the exact species shown in these images; the location must be returned to next year during summer’s mid-season for better identification. Such is the fun of being an aspiring naturalist.

White delicates…

 

Top side of Daisy after rainfall, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Top side of Daisy after rainfall, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Close-up topside and underside views of a Daisy after the rain. Whites show detail best in photographs when the sky is overcast and lighting is uniform. In such a setting both the highlights and shadows of white subjects are able to present their particulars.

Under side looking toward brightening sky, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

Under side looking toward brightening sky, copyright 2014 Pamela Breitberg

This Daisy was recently planted in a large pot by our front door, within reach of rainfall so that this gardener can use less hosed water. There was no tag on it when purchased but my thought is that it is the popular perennial Shasta Daisy and not the OxEye Daisy.

 

 

Looking at the details…

Nodding Onion copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Nodding Onion copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

 

Nodding Onion bloom and bud copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Nodding Onion bloom and bud copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

        Revelation is in the detail. Zoom in on each of image and see what more often than not remains unnoticed. Plump balls of morning dew crowd on pedals and stems while stamen and buds appear dry. These blooms nod not because of abundant mass but as an adaptation that helps deter insects while also protecting the nectar from rain. In spite of the incredible dexterity of flying insects most choose not to hang upside down. The bee is the benefactor of this plant’s design, enjoying the protected nectar of Nodding Onion (Allium cernuum) .


These images are busier in composition than I prefer; too many lines and no real focal point that makes the subject easily understood. The thin grass leaves are echoed by the long thin pedicels holding each flower. Only the change in color from green to pinkish white and the spherical cluster of blooms draw one’s eye to this plant. Yet, like the prairie, taking a close look at each image is time well spent.