Tread softly…

Tread softly is not just a warning about this plant that when touched will cause a burning rash. This plant too was on the restored dune area of the Lauderdale by the Sea beach. The pretty white flowers betray it’s named warning; Tread softly (Cnidoscolus stimulosus). I would suggest tread away from any patches of this plant; another reason to stay on established pathways.

Macro photo of the pretty little white Tread Softly flower. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The prickly bristles are evident here; strongly suggesting I avoid touching. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Not an area to walk in. Note the dangerous Tread Softly with clusters of even sharper Beach Star plants. Not all the danger is found in the ocean’s waters. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

R-rated naming…

Who would think that the lovely Orchid (Orchidaceae) name is derived from the Anciet Greek name for testicle; noting the shape of the twin tubers of some speicies. (see https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchidaceae).

The beauty of this species brings forth other discriptors from viewers; at least from this viewer. This Orchid had been successfully attached to a tree in the quaint Lauderdale by the Sea Village retail area.

Earth Day Blessings…

Restoration and sustainability of the beach dune areas In Lauderdale by the Sea has been in progress the past three years. This patch of Sea Oats (Uniola paniculata) has matured. A blessed Earth Day to you today and every day! Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Sun on the beach…

This bit of sunshine is the Dune Sunflower (Helianthus debilis) found on the sandy bank just off the beach in front of Sea Watch restaurant, Lauderdale by the Sea. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Bright growth amongst the arid…

Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) close-up view. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK this image to read more information on the Purslane. This cluster was on the beach side of Sea Watch restaurant in Lauderdale by the Sea,a Florida. BOTH places I heartily recommend. Copyrightberg

Royalty at the Sea…

Royal Terns attempting to claim space while they watch for a meal. Perhaps acting un-royal at this moment. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royal Tern (Thalasseus maximus) means “greatest Sea fisherman”. Quite a statement to live up to. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Royal Terns‘ tail feathers fan out when they are flight. Compare to the closed position otherwise on the beach. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Amid the human footprints the Royal Terns take a break from fishing, yet remain alert for more human feet. Notice their wings-out stance. They waddle to and from the shoreline in this stance. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Honing my skills…

I realize that each painting I’ve done has a different feel to them. It also seems that while I try to pick a scene that’s simple so my work will be less, in reality EVERYTHING has detail. Never thought I’d spent HOURS on clouds. The challenge of painting continues to be fun, so I’ll keep on keeping on. Here’s painting number three, the last one from my classes. Actually, I only began it during my last class so have replied on my husband’s critiquing to help me make decisions during the way.

As always, I’m more than ready to hear your opinions.

The scene is looking South to Anglin’s Pier in Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida. I included Pelicans, a favorite for me. Can you find the “heart”? Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Airy resurrection…

This resurrection is an air Fern known for going dormant or dead-like during times of drought and then vibrantly returning with a little rain. The Resurrection Fern (Pleopeltis polypodiodes) is an air fern, attaching to live Oak trees and obtaining it’s nutrients and moisture from the air.

Remergence of the Resurrection Fern. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mini ecosystem on this tropical tree including the Resurrection Fern. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Snake, snake!!….

The Ahinga (Ahinga Ahinga) seems to need it’s name reinforced with repetition. Other telling names are Snake Bird, Water Turkey and American Darter. When in the water the body is submerged except for the long neck yielding the appearance of a snake, giving it the nickname of Snake Bird, which is a translation the Brazillian Tupi word “Ahinga.

Female Ahinga. Notice it’s Scarlett red eyes rimmed with blue. The pale neck and breast distinguish it from the male. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The Ahinga uses it’s beak like a spear to catch it’s fish dinner. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on the Ahinga. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Dingy beauty…

An oxymoron it seems; but someone chose its name, Dingy-flowered Star Orchid (Epidendrum amphistomum). Orchids are never “dingy”. But this is this dear Orchid’s name.

The Dingy-flowered Star Orchid is considered an endangered native of Florida.

Tiny Orchid blooms have visitors. This flower has no nectar but it’s aroma attracts moths (not shown here) for pollination. Copyright 2018, Pamela Breitberg

Overall view of the Dingy-flowered Star Orchid. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg