Nature’s skyscraper…

Jerusalem Artichokes nod to distant man-made skyscrapers as they reach to the sky around Lincoln Park’s North Pond. The John Hancock is the high building with the two antennas. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Obediant Plants seemed to mimic Chicago’s downtown skyscrapers in design and statue. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Ever changing…

Confused by seeing very dark cloud above white clouds. In awe of nature and God. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

View from a 16th floor shows a complete range of the ever changing Ocean weather in Florida’s East coast. Always breathtaking. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Of course I chose to take a walk one day when I “thought” rain was moving away from me; heading toward Anglin’s Pier, Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The Power in nature; ever changing colors as well as weather. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Capturing the full moon surrounded by large Cumulus cloud and Palm leaves. Ahhhhh……Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Breaking through…

Fresh snow and newly arrived sunshine in Harms Woods, Skokie, Illinois. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Yesterday was all grey as the we received the first measurable snowfall of this winter, 7.5 inches. Today, as I drove past my old Forest Preserve stomping grounds I saw the sun peaking in and out of the clouds. Look closely and you can see a round disk in the sky that at first appears to be the moon; but it’s the sun bringing an array of color to the monochrome scene.

prolific ways of the prairie…

Summer on prairie copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Summer on prairie copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait shadow on prairie copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Portrait shadow on prairie copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Awesome, open, stable, prolific, clean, diverse, and untamed. These are all words that help explain a prairie. Some have mistaken a prairie for a weed patch. This particular prairie is a restoration project, roughly five years towards maturity. The diversity of summer prairie blooms is event on this low hill, a good place to test plant identification skills. With any luck this prairie will survive for hundreds of years; dormant seeds can lie wait decades when poor conditions occur; roots grow many feet deep insuring survival during drought and fire. In addition to the plant species that make a prairie a prairie are wide open blue skies with a few wispy clouds, masking the reality of strong blowing winds animating the plants beneath.

Bee Balm copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Bee Balm copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Bee Balm (Monarda didyma) (which like most flowers does attract bees) was plentiful this late July evening, partly because it tends to colonize. Considered native by some naturalists and “introduced” by other, its origins are the Eastern United States and has since spread to the Midwest, providing more fuel to restoration dialogues. What time period does one choose as a restoration point when restoring “native” lands?

Full of peace, secluded, ever-changing, mature, subtle diversity, and safe. As I review these images I think reflect on my garden, perennial beds home to some native species; twenty-seven years in the making. My garden is loosely organized. Living across the street from a forest preserve I purposely chose to keep my garden casual in design. No squared off lawn edging, no crisply trimmed shrubs, no formal brick division between lawn and perennial beds. The perennials have chosen to re-seed outside of designated planned spaces, reinforcing the casual design plan.

Preserved garden by forest preserve copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg

Preserved garden by forest preserve copyright 2013 Pamela Breitberg