American treasure…

Sandhill Crane (Grass canadenis) relaxing in the Rookery area of Flamingo Gardens. It is distinguished by it’s large size and red forehead. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

These birds are unwanted in neighborhoods because they are agressive due to habitat destruction threatening their population in Florida. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on living with Sandhill Cranes. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Eye-catching…

I don’t know it’s name, but it sure got my attention when walking past it. I stopped and studied the details for quite awhile. It was at Flamingo Gardens. I don’t what stage of bloom it’s in either; unsure if it’s done flowering or getting ready to flower. If YOU know, please share. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

A Nest of Seeds…

Female Cycad plant in seed. Copyright 2018, Pamela Breitberg

A “nest” of seeds. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A non-palm, palm looking plant. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Leaves are large and prolific on each plant. They are palm-like, glossy and tightly arranged around a center single stalk. This is not a palm at all, but its own species, Cycad. This was near the Spanish Moss shown a few posts ago; so when looking at the center I was not certain whether the “fuzz” was fallen Moss or apart of the plant. It turns out the plant is a female (yes, there are separate female and male Cycads) with seed resting inside a fuzzy cushion.

This striking plant is a frequently found garden species in southern regions of the U.S. This one was in the Alfred Maclay Gardens State Park in Tallahassee, Florida. Cycad has many names and a Japanese ancestry.
Formally it is known as Cycas revoluta (Syotetsu [Japanese ソテツ], sago palmking sagosago cycadJapanese sago palm). Cycad means “curled back” referring to the leaves’ downward curve.

From: https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/sago%20palm.htm

“Female plants produce a round, felt mass in the center of the leaf mass. Bright orange to yellow seeds mature on the female plant during mid-summer to fall.”

Patches of blue…

Chicory and Bee. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

The blue blooms of Chicory easily draw attention against the neutral grays of concrete. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Chicory (Cichorium intybus) graces the walls edge along Lincoln Park’s lakefront pathway. I call this plant by its nickname, “Cornflower“. Typical of many plant names both Chicory and Cornflower identify several unique species. Chicory shown here is an invasive Eurasian weed. Its cheerful blue flower is a welcome sight along an otherwise gray-toned location.

Concrete barrier along Lake Michigan serves as a flood wall and walking path in Lincoln Park. Chicory blooms appear frequently along side this pathway. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg