Local wildlife…

In North America, a common wild animal is the Eastern Grey Squirrel. Technically a “rodent”, the Grey Squirrel is considered either a beloved neighbor or an unwelcome rat. I fall into the first group; when I had my own garden I enjoyed watching them dine on spilled birdseed laying under the feeder. CLICK on the image for more information. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Love the thick, furry tail. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Observing observers…

The art was creative and diverse in both medium and message. Similarly, diversity was the public attendees of this event. This was a perfect photo opportunity. These images focus on the many dogs taking in the scenes. I can’t help but wonder their thoughts.

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“Well hello!!” Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

“What is going on?” Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Stopping to watch and rest. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

“What about me?” Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

“Really??!!” Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

“Enough!” Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

“Let’s go!” Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Different personalities and stamina. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Ready, set,…… Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Spoiled and proud of it! Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Durable, beneficial, loveliness…

This delicate bloom can withstand the harsh shoreline environment including winds and waters. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

This delicate bloom can withstand the harsh shoreline environment including winds and waters. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Time on the beach, for me, includes checking out the plants on the inland edges. My newness to the area had me assuming that this thick, prolific mass was native to the area. Closer study has taught me this is not the case.

Natal Plum (Carissa macrocarpa) is the African relative of Florida’s native Coco Plum. Both species live on the sandy shores. Both have edible plum-like fruits. Natal Plums’s invasive character includes spine tipped leaves which are oft overlooked with focus going to their graceful year-long blooming white flowers and reddish fruit.

After flowering the Natal Plum fruits emerge here, still too unripe for eating. The “plum” is the only non-poisonous part of the Natal Plum. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Ready to eat Natal Plum. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Seasonal modifications…

Several posts ago I showed images of activities in Lincoln Park after our first measurable snowfall. Here is one more plus some photographs taken last spring. Quite a difference between the two seasons. Each season brings its own recreational happenings.

Snowman building is a team effort. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Another couple with their pet walk along the lakefront path, avoiding the more populated bike/pedestrian path further west. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

The lawn areas pf Lincoln Park are often too wet for people to use in the early spring. While people stay on pathways this time of year a pair of ducks relax in one of many vernal pools.

The lawn areas of Lincoln Park are often too wet for people to use in the early spring. While people stay on pathways this time of year a pair of ducks relax in one of many vernal pools.

Spring’s varied habitats…

Two micro habitats on forest floor. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Two micro habitats on forest floor. copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Two very different habitats though inches away in location. In the first image, the forest floor still has some un-melted snow while the top side of a decaying log resting on the same floor hosts a warmer habitat’s greening moss. The second image shows more green moss atop two logs resting in a typical vernal pool. Vernal pools are temporary springtime micro-habitats created when the still frozen ground has not yet absorbed the melted snows of winter.

Vernal spring pond with moss laden logs, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Vernal spring pond with moss laden logs, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg