What plant does this belong to….

What early summer seed head does this belong to? It should be a native plant because in a restored prairie area of Lincoln Park, Chicago. It doesn’t seem to be Wild Quinine, nor Queen of the Prairie, nor Cow Parsnip which are all beginning to go into seed. But the seed head is conspicuous and amazing to observe. Enjoy. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Prolific abundance of seeds can sometimes single a stressed plant; it provides for the future of it’s species by making many more seeds than usual. Saving the species takes precedence over saving it’s own life. An interesting concept! Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

July snowballs…

Those that have read my blog for a while know that Snowball flowers are one of my favorite since childhood. In my garden I had a Snowball Shrub (Viburnum plicatum). The Snowballs I observe in abundance now are Snowball Hydrangea (Handrangea arborescens), a shrub with a lower profile and native to the United States of unlike the Viburnum species. Thier intricate, delicate, complicated design is truly the work of higher being.

The delicate color changes with subtle lighting changes. Flowers are a greenish white in the sunlight and a golden off-white in the shade. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Simple design of each flower plus dozens, perhaps hundereds or blooms per cluster equal an established miracle. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Shooting stars in Lincoln Park…

Feel the warmth of the late springtime air. The grasses are green and the Shooting Star is in bloom by North Pond in Lincoln Park, Chicago. This delicate beauty is a native perennial for Chicago. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Close up of the small, too often unnoticed, Shooting Star. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Just ducky…

Out of the water for a bit, this male Mallard tries to hide among the Dandelions. These images were all taken one morning at Lincoln Park’s North Pond. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Grooming is ever a process when out of the water. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

Male Wood Duck sunning on a warm spring day. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mallard Duck family enjoying an outing in Lincoln’s Park, North Pond, Chicago. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Religiously Royal…

Close up image of the male and female flowers of a Royal Palm (Roystonea regia). The popular, native species, has separate male and female flowers. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

Cuba and Christians both connect the Royal Palm with religious signifigance. The specie’s primary use is for landscaping in Florida. Copyrightberg.

CLICK image above to become more familiar with the Royal Palm. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Native wild in Chicago…

These delicate spring blooms are the only Columbine native to Illinois: Wild Columbine (Aquilegia canadensis). These blooms were prolific today in Lincoln Park’s best kept secret, Alfred Caldwell Lily Pond.

Abundant spring Wild Columbine brighten the shady Caldwell Lily Pond. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Close up image of one of the Wild Columbine flowers. These flowers are visited by insects but avoided by larger animals who find them poisonous. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Restorative scene with Wild Columbine inviting one’s restful enjoyment. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

For more information on this Illinois native CLICK the image above. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Leafing out…

This time of year the leaves are new on the popular Sea Grape tree/shrubs. The “grapes” will follow later in the season. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

These Sea Grape trees had weathered leaves from the nearby ocean setting. New leaves were yet untouched by the salty winds. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

New Sea Grape leaves are reddish; mature leaves are green. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mmmm mangos…

I always assumed Mango trees grew about the size of apple and cherry trees. I should know that in tropical climates everything thrives better. We saw this tree on our neighborhood walk the other day. There were a few Mango low enough that I could have sampled one or two; but I was good and just captured these images. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Not quite ripe enough to enjoy other than with my eyes. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Dingy beauty…

An oxymoron it seems; but someone chose its name, Dingy-flowered Star Orchid (Epidendrum amphistomum). Orchids are never “dingy”. But this is this dear Orchid’s name.

The Dingy-flowered Star Orchid is considered an endangered native of Florida.

Tiny Orchid blooms have visitors. This flower has no nectar but it’s aroma attracts moths (not shown here) for pollination. Copyright 2018, Pamela Breitberg

Overall view of the Dingy-flowered Star Orchid. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

American treasure…

Sandhill Crane (Grass canadenis) relaxing in the Rookery area of Flamingo Gardens. It is distinguished by it’s large size and red forehead. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

These birds are unwanted in neighborhoods because they are agressive due to habitat destruction threatening their population in Florida. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on living with Sandhill Cranes. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg