24 hour beauty…

Equisite Day Lily (Hermocallis) in bloom outside a Chicago condominium. What stopped me in my walk was the proliferation of blooms. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Daylilies come in numerous colors and shades. Years ago I added some prized Daylilies to my garden only to have them devoured by local Deer. They like their taste better than their beauty. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Brilliant in colors and size. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Nature’s bouquet of abundance. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Leafing out…

This time of year the leaves are new on the popular Sea Grape tree/shrubs. The “grapes” will follow later in the season. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

These Sea Grape trees had weathered leaves from the nearby ocean setting. New leaves were yet untouched by the salty winds. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

New Sea Grape leaves are reddish; mature leaves are green. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mmmm mangos…

I always assumed Mango trees grew about the size of apple and cherry trees. I should know that in tropical climates everything thrives better. We saw this tree on our neighborhood walk the other day. There were a few Mango low enough that I could have sampled one or two; but I was good and just captured these images. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Not quite ripe enough to enjoy other than with my eyes. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Random pattern combinations…

Nature and human took part in both the sidewalk and the stand of Bamboo. Both settings have been designed by human hands. Both settings have been altered over time by nature.

Human chosen natural elements in the concrete mixture; use of Florida’s Coral and shells. Nature’s chosen addition with plant and algae. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Walkway through the Bonnet House Courtyard is concrete with much Coral and shell in it’s composition. Algae and “volunteer” plants add color. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Human planting design enhanced by nature’s sunlight and random growth of the Bamboo. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

When is a prairie is not a prairie…

The overal scene looks so much like an untouched prairie; greens are flourishing and going on for miles and miles. The sky is never ending. A vulture scans for lunch. This prairie is wild; no telephone lines or roads interupt it’s untamed beauty.

But on closer inspection, or if you remember you’re on “Aligator Alley”, a part of I75, you see evidence that this isn’t even a wetland prairie swam or bog. It’s much wetter and is infact part of the Florida Everglades. Take the closer look into this profound region.

“Prairie” grasses with wide open skies; NOT. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Hint: Great Egrets are not found in prairies. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Alligators are definitely not a part of a prairie habitat. They do bask in the sun next to water while they await their next meal. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The Snowy Egret takes off to continue it’s hunt for food in Florida’s Everglades. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Native abundance…

“This plant is a native, and with true American perspicacity and enterprise has forged his way from

magenta obscurity to the most prominent place in the floral world.”

‘My Garden’ by Louise Beebe Wilder, 1916

Phlox abundance. May you see the wonder all around you. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Prairie homeland…

Looking back to the more colorful days of late summer, early autumn.

Hardy, perennial prairie plants gradually go dormant, resting until next springs longer, warmer days. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Purple prairie clover (Dalea purpurea) amongst prairie diversity. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Purple Aster, a dependable sign of the end of Summer. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Hunger has been satiated….

Chicago is FLAT unless you include concrete overpasses and underpasses. Starved Rock State Park is a short two-hour drive west from my hometown flatland. The change in environment is extreme and refreshing. Also, it is exhausting for Chicagoans’ muscles used to walking flatland. So, while I rest my arthritic knee and other stressed body parts, I will share some this area’s splendor. My aches are welcome remnants of time well spent; my body will heal and my memories will last for ages.

Some images are from the nearby Matthiessen State Park which we visited as well thanks to the strong recommendation of our daughter. Both Starved Rock and Matthiessen State Parks in Illinois are results of glacial movement south and then melting and retreat. These parks are witness to natures’ strength and constant change.

Warning to anyone that thinks venturing off marked paths would be fun! Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Canyons of Matthiessen State Park. The people in the background give you an idea of its grand perspective. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg.

That bridge is partway down into the canyon. Awe inspiring views. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Wild Cat Canyon in Starved Rock State Park. One of many canyons in the preserve. Waterfalls were very small because of lack of rain recently. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

100 steps down from the Lodge was the “beginning” of many more steps down into canyon bottoms. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

 

Petite bouquets…

Eastern Daisy Fleabane (Erigeron annuus) shows up voluntarily along paths and roadsides. The flowers are thumbnail sized and bloom in bouquet arrangements tempting passersby to capture their loveliness. Today I brought them home as images saved.

Portrait of Daily Fleabane. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Nature’s bouquet. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg