Just ducky…

Out of the water for a bit, this male Mallard tries to hide among the Dandelions. These images were all taken one morning at Lincoln Park’s North Pond. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Grooming is ever a process when out of the water. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

Male Wood Duck sunning on a warm spring day. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mallard Duck family enjoying an outing in Lincoln’s Park, North Pond, Chicago. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Sometimes it’s best to go with the wind…

I remind myself

Many times a day, a week,

To accept what I can’t control.

To accept what I can’t change.

I remind myself to let life flow

To take advantage of winds of change

And use change to move forward.

I remind myself life is richer

When I embrace the flows of my life.

Sturdy enough to handle the winds of incoming weather changes. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Skilled at using the winds to move to and from as a community. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Natural respite…

Wilderness inside Lincoln Park, Chicago. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Wilderness haven inside Lincoln Park, Chicago. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Behind the black wire barrier, a volunteer pulls weeds, non-native species, from an area restricted to non-human entrants. This sectioned-off part of Lincoln Park is one of several “Migratory Bird Sanctuaries” in the park. The designated space has earthen trails around its perimeter providing a wilderness reprieve for the urban weary. The space is comparatively small, but time spent here is relevantly grand.

Beautiful spring wildflower blooming along the trail. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

 

Bitter fruit…

Barberry berries hanging on throughout winter's storms, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Barberry berries hanging on throughout winter’s storms, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Uneaten fruits, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Uneaten fruits, copyright 2015 Pamela Breitberg

Japanese Barberry (Berberis thunbergii) berries always take me by surprise when I spot their appearance in my otherwise barren winter garden. At times like our recent 19 inches of fresh snow, I expect our wintering, non-hibernating wildlife to be eating remaining food sources. The deer are frequent visitors to our yew shrub; no need for spring trimming by our hands. Yet, the bright red, attention grabbing berries of the Barberry bush remain abundantly intact on the branches. It turns out that their bitter taste; along with the thorny branches repel even the hungriest wild appetites. Us, humans, however have been known to eat them and use them medicinally.

Deer enjoying our Yew, copyright 2015 Steven Breitberg

Deer enjoying our Yew, copyright 2015 Steven Breitberg