It’s beginning to happen…

The leaves don’t lie, Autumn is arriving and the next stage of life for our plants and many animals is underway. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

In less than a day this tree went from one yellow leaf to clusters of yellow I’m hoping that our soaking rains will insure a colorful fall. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

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Freshly fallen…

Still lovely, as it’s freshly fallen off the stem. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

Multiple stages of life appear on this perennial. Flowering averages three weeks on summer perennials. Copyright 2017, Pamela Breitberg

Today there was an abundance of fallen flowers. What surprised me was the falling of complete flowers; usually petals fall one at a time. Copyright 2017 Pamela Breitberg

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On the move…

Seeds ready to be dispersed, ensuring continuation of the cycle of life. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Empty brackets. Now is the time of winter’s dormancy. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

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End of summer…

Macro view of Hydrangea bloom and seeds. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Macro view of Hydrangea bloom and seeds. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

 

Drying on-the-vine Hydrangea

Color-fading blossoms

Flowers turns to seed

Perennial preparation for

A season’s passing days.

 

NOTE: The pink, or blue, color of the Hydrangea is known to be controllable. See the following information: www.hydrangeashydrangeas.com/colorchange.html

Closeup of Hydrangea bloom changing to seed. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

Closeup of Hydrangea bloom changing to seed. Copyright 2016 Pamela Breitberg

 

Hydrangea seeds in Lincoln Park, Chicago. copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Hydrangea seeds in Lincoln Park, Chicago. copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Light and shadow of a macro view of Hydrangea. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

Light and shadow of a macro view of Hydrangea. Copyright 2016, Pamela Breitberg

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Native fruits…

Dormancy happens in the heat of summer for some spring-blooming, native woodland plants. Leaves brown, wither, and then become a part of the forest floor. Later in summer the fruit appears. These images are of the native Jack in the Pulpit, shown May 12, 2013 (Humble Interests) with dried leaves still attached to the plant.

The fruit of the native Jack-in-the-Pulpit. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

The fruit of the native Jack-in-the-Pulpit. Copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Drying leaves of Jack-in-the Pulpit. copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

Drying leaves of Jack-in-the Pulpit. copyright 2015, Pamela Breitberg

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