Expanded views…

Louie Bossi’s restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale has a sweet courtyard dining area that’s a must whenever you’re on Las Olas Blvd. Besides incredible food the environment invites one to let their troubles drift away and relax. One of the design elements are many vintage windows that frame mirrors, hung on their brick walls. The impression created is that of a lush tropical garden, because of multiplied images of each plant in the courtyard. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Real reflection…

Eating another delicious lunch at the 15th Street Fisheries in Ft. Lauderdale’s Marina this reflection in the water of the dock caught my attention. The mesh screen between us and the water is there to keep birds away from our food; though they are skilled at grabbing it in the air when Tarpon feeding is happening. When you go plan to feed the Tarpon in this water between dock and restaurant. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Random pattern combinations…

Nature and human took part in both the sidewalk and the stand of Bamboo. Both settings have been designed by human hands. Both settings have been altered over time by nature.

Human chosen natural elements in the concrete mixture; use of Florida’s Coral and shells. Nature’s chosen addition with plant and algae. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Walkway through the Bonnet House Courtyard is concrete with much Coral and shell in it’s composition. Algae and “volunteer” plants add color. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Human planting design enhanced by nature’s sunlight and random growth of the Bamboo. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Background designs…

Backgrounds should compliment and not distract the viewer from the main subject. When they are out of focus they add an element of dimension to the image. These two images of Ibis, at Flaminco Gardens in their Rookery area, cleary demonstrate impressionistic, out-of-focus backgrounds. Not sure if they’re too distracting; but for me they add an element of design not usually found in images of birds. Enjoy or not; let me know please.

Ibis in the Duckweed rich Rookery at Flamingo Gardens. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A little while later the Ibis was in a clearer patch of the Rookery pond. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Conspicuous males…

Soft red, fuzzy Chenille Plant (Plumbago auriculata) blooms are all male. The female blooms are inconspicuous. Perhaps more interesting, the male blooms have no petals! So to be pollinated the plant uses male attractiveness to spread pollen while the female does the work of seed production. This seems more like birds and other animal kingdom members than plants’ design.

Chenille is a favorite material for warm winter robes and these plants’ blooms do resemble it’s namesake.

Aptly named Chenille Plant commanded my attention as well as pollenators. I am constantly amazed by nature’s multitude of design choices; each a little (or big) miracle. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Image showing details of another of God’s wondrous designs. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Cool patterns…

The crossing patterns of lines caught my attention. I can’t help but feel pleasantly cool when looking at this image. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

New observation…

Another striking find during a walk at Flamingo Gardens. I wanted to touch them and see how hard or soft, how light or heavy they felt. Too high in the tree to answer the question. Look at the Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) tree. God (or whatever higher being your recognize) never ceases to amaze and humble me with his designs and creations.

The Tamarind tree are filled with pods caring multiple fruit which is edible and medicinal. The fruit is sweetest when the pods are dark brown. Each Tamarind tree yeilds over 350 pounds of fruit per year. CLICK the image to learn more. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Tamarind is a native of Aftrica; but enjoyed in many tropical parts of the world. I look forward to trying to view it when in flower, though the flowers are less striking in presence. I look forward to buying some Tamarind jam for my breakfast toast. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Ornamental use of immigrants…

These unique Egyptian Geese (Alpochen aegyptiaca) birds were considered sacred by Eyptians. Americans imported them as decor for Golf Courses. Were our own wildlife too ugly or boring? Some have now vacated the golf courses for the wild.

This family was at the animal rescue facilities of Flamingo Gardens in Davie Florida. They are in the Rookery section which is open so they could wander if wanted. Many of their birds are not able to be released because of injury or “imprinting” (taming by people), so would not survive in the wild. Any animal that does recover is released as soon as it’s health returns.

I never tire of seeing new miracles of God’s designs. So amazing.

Egyptian Goose checking out the Rookery. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mom and Dad introducing the babies to the Rookery environment. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The previous post showed the Egyptian Geese babies in the water and Duckweed. Shortly afterwards Mom (or Dad) joined them. First they had time to explore without parental accompanying them. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mom (or Dad?!) and baby. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Lastly, the entire family enjoys an outing. So did we! Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Planned and sponstaneous patterns in design…

Sunlight shines on water moving around rocks while a footbridge casts it’s shadow causing unplanned for patterns in the aesthetically designed scene. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

More confusion in the scene when one views the wider setting. The garden design is lovely and relaxing to observe unless you pay attention to the bridge’s distraction shadow patterns. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breirberg