Beloved…

One of my favorite garden flowers is the Peony. Traditional perennial choice because of it’s striking early summer beauty and aroma. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Mom, an avid gardener, discouraged me from adding Peony to my new garden (years ago) because their delicate blooms can easily be blown by storms and winds. I found they are excellent cut flowers when cut as soon as the bud shows it’s colors. Sometimes the delicate, short lived, is worth it’s brief visit. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Fun possibilities…

‘Tis the season of the ever loved/hated Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale). Loved by children. Hated by most adults; myself excluded now that I no longer have my own garden. A child’s eye level view of the Dandelion is the best! Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Close up view of the fun loving seedhead; enticing children of all ages to help spread the seads with a mighty puff of air. Though considered a weed, the Dandelion is edible in it’s entirety. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Considered a weed because the Dandelion is a prolific producer, flourishing almost anywhere. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Religiously Royal…

Close up image of the male and female flowers of a Royal Palm (Roystonea regia). The popular, native species, has separate male and female flowers. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

Cuba and Christians both connect the Royal Palm with religious signifigance. The specie’s primary use is for landscaping in Florida. Copyrightberg.

CLICK image above to become more familiar with the Royal Palm. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A sweet element…

While strolling through a garden I was guided by a welcoming sweet aroma to the site of this blooming Gardenia shrub. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Ready to bloom. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Poolside garden…

This Bulbine ( frutescens) was planted by a pool in a small rock garden. A South African native, it tolerate hot, dry and Sandy enviornments. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Bulbines produce either yellow or orange flowers. CLICK image above for more infomation. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Another “egg yolk” variety…

Both varieties of Plumeria (see previous post for other variety) were found on a stroll through a gated community in Ft. Lauderdale. It does seem appropriate to find such beauty in a secure environment; but apparently it is a favorite garden addition in tropical climates.

Taking advantage of a lower branch of this Plumeria tree I was able to get a closer image for your and my enjoyment. This species has the common five petals per bloom. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Plumeria tree with blooms and leaves. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Delicious Egg Yolks in the sky…

The Cantonese name for this tree is a fitting descriptor. Looking into the sky at this otherwise bare tree one sees it’s namesake flower, “gaai daan fa” meaning “egg yolk flower”. Plumeria is the more common name of this tropical favorite, named after a French botanist and explorer, Charles Plumber.

This Plumeria is mostly empty of leaves drawing complete attention to it’s luscious blooms. My attention was first on the bare appearance of the trunk assuming I was looking at a dead or distressed tree. Silly me. This variety has six petal flowers; most have five. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The rich color on the thick petals are awesome. CLICK the image for more information. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Playful Asian…

This delicate Asian native, Pinwheel Jasmine (tabernaemontana divaricata) quietly commanded attention at the Morikami Japanese Garden in Del Ray, Florida. The leaves are evergreen with the most prolific bloom time being spring. Enjoy.

For history of it’s medicinal use: https://ww anw.naturalremedies.org/jasmin/