Religiously Royal…

Close up image of the male and female flowers of a Royal Palm (Roystonea regia). The popular, native species, has separate male and female flowers. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

Cuba and Christians both connect the Royal Palm with religious signifigance. The specie’s primary use is for landscaping in Florida. Copyrightberg.

CLICK image above to become more familiar with the Royal Palm. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Cool patterns…

The crossing patterns of lines caught my attention. I can’t help but feel pleasantly cool when looking at this image. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Berry bounty…

Unsure of the specific Palm variety here, but the berries were prolific and in all stages of ripening. Also unsure if these are edible. They were part of the foilage in the Bonnett House Courtyard, Ft. Lauderdale Florida.

Palm Tree rich with hanging clusters of berries.Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

‘Tis the season for berries. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Tropical sunlight and shadow…

Lovely palm, with sunlight creating detail in the leaves; outside entrance to the Bonnett House, Ft. Lauderdale. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Shadows of the palm in the surrounding sand. Strong sunlight yields strong shadows. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Details in the tropical shadows. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A Nest of Seeds…

Female Cycad plant in seed. Copyright 2018, Pamela Breitberg

A “nest” of seeds. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A non-palm, palm looking plant. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Leaves are large and prolific on each plant. They are palm-like, glossy and tightly arranged around a center single stalk. This is not a palm at all, but its own species, Cycad. This was near the Spanish Moss shown a few posts ago; so when looking at the center I was not certain whether the “fuzz” was fallen Moss or apart of the plant. It turns out the plant is a female (yes, there are separate female and male Cycads) with seed resting inside a fuzzy cushion.

This striking plant is a frequently found garden species in southern regions of the U.S. This one was in the Alfred Maclay Gardens State Park in Tallahassee, Florida. Cycad has many names and a Japanese ancestry.
Formally it is known as Cycas revoluta (Syotetsu [Japanese ソテツ], sago palmking sagosago cycadJapanese sago palm). Cycad means “curled back” referring to the leaves’ downward curve.

From: https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/galveston/sago%20palm.htm

“Female plants produce a round, felt mass in the center of the leaf mass. Bright orange to yellow seeds mature on the female plant during mid-summer to fall.”