Mysterious beauty…

Spring blooming flower found on one of our neighborhood walks in Lauderdale by the Sea, Florida. I don’t know the name of this beauty. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Closer view of these flowers. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Religiously Royal…

Close up image of the male and female flowers of a Royal Palm (Roystonea regia). The popular, native species, has separate male and female flowers. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg.

Cuba and Christians both connect the Royal Palm with religious signifigance. The specie’s primary use is for landscaping in Florida. Copyrightberg.

CLICK image above to become more familiar with the Royal Palm. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

A sweet element…

While strolling through a garden I was guided by a welcoming sweet aroma to the site of this blooming Gardenia shrub. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Ready to bloom. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The royally honored…

Purple Heart, Purple Queen, Wandering Jew (Tradescantia pallida) are common names for this Mexican native. In Florida it is a favorite ground cover providing a touch of color to otherwise drab shady areas in the garden. Beside the Royal purple color of this plant and it’s flower I have found no reason that it has been given the name “Queen”.

Purple Queen is very much at home in Florida and can quickly become invasive in the garden; so attention is needed when introduced to a garden design. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Poolside garden…

This Bulbine ( frutescens) was planted by a pool in a small rock garden. A South African native, it tolerate hot, dry and Sandy enviornments. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Bulbines produce either yellow or orange flowers. CLICK image above for more infomation. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Leafing out…

This time of year the leaves are new on the popular Sea Grape tree/shrubs. The “grapes” will follow later in the season. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

These Sea Grape trees had weathered leaves from the nearby ocean setting. New leaves were yet untouched by the salty winds. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

New Sea Grape leaves are reddish; mature leaves are green. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Another “egg yolk” variety…

Both varieties of Plumeria (see previous post for other variety) were found on a stroll through a gated community in Ft. Lauderdale. It does seem appropriate to find such beauty in a secure environment; but apparently it is a favorite garden addition in tropical climates.

Taking advantage of a lower branch of this Plumeria tree I was able to get a closer image for your and my enjoyment. This species has the common five petals per bloom. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Plumeria tree with blooms and leaves. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

Delicious Egg Yolks in the sky…

The Cantonese name for this tree is a fitting descriptor. Looking into the sky at this otherwise bare tree one sees it’s namesake flower, “gaai daan fa” meaning “egg yolk flower”. Plumeria is the more common name of this tropical favorite, named after a French botanist and explorer, Charles Plumber.

This Plumeria is mostly empty of leaves drawing complete attention to it’s luscious blooms. My attention was first on the bare appearance of the trunk assuming I was looking at a dead or distressed tree. Silly me. This variety has six petal flowers; most have five. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The rich color on the thick petals are awesome. CLICK the image for more information. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

R-rated naming…

Who would think that the lovely Orchid (Orchidaceae) name is derived from the Anciet Greek name for testicle; noting the shape of the twin tubers of some speicies. (see https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orchidaceae).

The beauty of this species brings forth other discriptors from viewers; at least from this viewer. This Orchid had been successfully attached to a tree in the quaint Lauderdale by the Sea Village retail area.

Snake, snake!!….

The Ahinga (Ahinga Ahinga) seems to need it’s name reinforced with repetition. Other telling names are Snake Bird, Water Turkey and American Darter. When in the water the body is submerged except for the long neck yielding the appearance of a snake, giving it the nickname of Snake Bird, which is a translation the Brazillian Tupi word “Ahinga.

Female Ahinga. Notice it’s Scarlett red eyes rimmed with blue. The pale neck and breast distinguish it from the male. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

The Ahinga uses it’s beak like a spear to catch it’s fish dinner. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg

CLICK on the image above for more information on the Ahinga. Copyright 2018 Pamela Breitberg